Tuesday, July 29, 2008

Well, my dog's not testing it for you.

17 comments:

Lex said...

Kinda like Microsoft using its paying customers as de-facto beta testers. In a just world, the shrink-wrapped package would say something like this:

"CAUTION: Microsoft Vista has not been testedy by ... well, anybody, really."

Sander said...

An animal shop in my street is actually promoting exactly this, dogfood that's not tested on animals.. Been wondering about it every time I passed by. I'd keep it silent if I were them :D

jessica said...

the point is that they don't test all the nasty chemical preservatives and stuff on the animals before they use them in the food. Most companies who have pet food that isn't tested on animals also avoid all the nasties that would need to be 'proven' safe before wider consumption. Of course they feed it to animals to make sure it's tasty enough (which doesn't count as 'testing').

It's the pet food companies that need to 'test' on animals that are worrisome...

heather said...

priceless!

Christine said...

It's actually not a joke. Companies like Iams do horrible things to dogs and other animals behind closed doors for so called 'nutritional studies.'

http://www.iamscruelty.com/

Prometeo said...

I have always wondered how do animal food companies reach the results to put on their product labels things like "tasty", "preferred by 9 of 10 dogs/cats" and other catchy phrases. I mean if you are going to sell animal food at least a taste test should be done, right?

LunaML said...

This has very flawed quant logic. This says "All worrisome things that are labled 'not tested on animals' are dog food." A subset of that statement is "no worrisome things that are labled 'not tested on animals' are not dog food." What about pet shampoo? It would be much better to put worrisome as an intersection of dog food and things labled "not tested on animals" with a generic universal.

Holly said...

My guinea pig's animal shampoo says "not tested on LAB animals." The implication, I think, is that they tested it in the sense of washing animals with it, but not in the sense of making them eat it or putting it in their eyes or anything.

Anonymous said...

Well put, LunaML. An uncharacteristic error.

Thoughtful Review Guy said...

Luanml, it doesn't say "not tested on animals," it says "'not tested on animals' badge."

Sergey said...

thoughtful review guy: lunaml is still right in taht an intersection would have made more logical sense.

as it stands, the diagram says that all dog food labels, including the ones with the "not tested on animals" badges are worrisome.

Anonymous said...

LOL! Oh Dear.

angellee said...

Odd. The pet food company I work for pays for private "taste tests." But its also a company that doesn't use crap like dye or artificial preservatives.

Damonius said...

I, too, was confused by this logic.

lewistheclark said...

Iams has cleaned up, but since that controversy a lot of people were worried about other companies. This also means there are no iffy chemicals in it.

And why would all products "not tested on animals" be worrying?

DaVince said...

So if it wasn't tested on animals, how do they know they'd like it? :P

Beej said...

This diagram looks like Mike Wasowski!

 
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