Wednesday, August 29, 2007

Have, have-not, or have-not-for-long?

16 comments:

Jeremy Ricketts said...

Oh wow. This is some of your best work ever. Forwarding to my sisters as their total financial advice for college and young adulthood.

April said...

I agree--one of the best!

Brandon said...

hmmmmm i like where this idea takes you, but the idea that this swirls around the whole middle class is ridiculous. i am thoroughly middle class, but if you have a good head on your shoulders and manage you finances properly you should be untouchable and still live a full life


buried as inaccurate

Jeane H Y said...

youre funny

Timothy said...

too true.

Mohammed said...

I am glad I discovered indexed. I am amazed how something like a simple index card can be used so effectively.
Please continue what you are doing.
In short - WOW

Chris said...

@ Brandon:

Hmm, would you not agree that it applies to most of the middle class? Maybe B should be "the world" and A should be "you."

Laura said...

Brandon, I'm with you.

As some smart person said recently about the economic downturn, "You never know who's swimming naked until the tide goes out."

Anonymous said...

I think A should equal "consumerism run amok"

Kell said...

Amen,sistah.

Victor said...

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Karl said...

This doesn't make sense to me. What kind of Venn diagram has a planet Saturn in the middle? Who says the whole middle class fits in the intersection? They mostly have good mortgages. The vultures certainly don't belong in the intersection. Not a Venn diagram.

Snowdrops said...

karl, relax and read the diagram again:

sub-prime mortgage + car loan + credit card debt = American middle class today

Given the above, the diagram then zoom into the middle class and further elaborates by drawing the 'saturn ring' to say that 'vultures' are surrounding those American middle class who fall into this triple debt-trap whammy.

I agree with Jeremy and April that this is one of the best diagrams ever. You may not agree with the analysis, but IMO this is one of the most creative and succinct ways of capturing the financial malaise that's afflicting much of the American middle class today.

jean said...

@ anonymous:

I agree, consumerism is at the very heart of the matter. The excitement of attaining "more, more, more" is our culture's greatest addiction, and is leading us down a very slippery slope, sad to say.

M.G.F. said...

I love this blog. Great Work!!!

Figiel.

julia said...

A = financial irresponsibility.

If you can't afford it, don't buy it. Sometimes taking a risk can be worthwhile, but choosing all three of these at once is just asking for trouble.

 
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