Tuesday, March 13, 2007

Predicated on whatever.

24 comments:

Michael said...

I don't think I understand this one. I tried dividing the words into their origins, which are Old English and Viking if I remember correctly, but that got me nowhere. What do the lines represent?

Chris4d said...

what is the name for this type of diagram?

Scribe said...

There was a runway gate sign I always passed at some airport when the plane was taxiing in after landing. All the gates seemed to be a 2-letter combo, and this one just said "BE". It made me smile.

justin said...

it's not a math equation... it's a sentence diagram!

pancreas said...

I'm getting a Coldplay Clocks vibe...

Aditya said...

I don't get the diagram either, but like pancreas, am getting a Coldplay vibe!

Digiduke said...

As much as it spoils a good joke, here's the explanation. It's a sentence diagram which in this case is saying "You Are [any adverb] [any predicate adjective]", which would be like "You are really funny."

John Martin said...

"You are a predicate adjective modifier."

Is that what that means?

Stu Savory said...

And I thought it was an Ishekawa diagram from the Quality Control Domain ;-)

Stu

PS: anyone know how to spell ambigoooooooooooooooooooooooooooo?

Brent said...

I got this one almost instantly -- and very clever. But it has come to my attention lately that not everyone spent as much time diagramming sentences when they were in grade school as I did...

Anonymous said...

...simply amazing.

Layenis said...

I saw his blog in a magazine in Brazil. I liked. Congratulations!!

Anonymous said...

Yes. . . I am

El Macho Grande said...

I love this one. I enjoyed diagramming sentences at the age of 12 or 13! It allowed me to apply a near-mathematical system to the troubling realm of language. I should do it more often.

Thanks.

Taylor said...

Diagramming sentences? I get the feeling that my education may have been inadequate...

Ijon said...

I remember the big orange folder with words on individual cards we had at primary school.

You stood it up and made sentences like a linguistic Play Your Cards Right.

Justin said...

Ahh, RK graphing.. I never learned it in high school, but I'm taking a linguistics course at the moment, and so we've been doing it for weeks. It's fun at first, until you try to graph journalistic sentences. Some people just can't write!

Katie said...

I have a suspicion that sentence diagramming is something you learn in American school, and not many other places. I certainly didn't learn it in Australia (and had never heard of it until I moved to the US).

heather said...

pure sunshine!

Carl said...

No such diagrams in Holland...

Anonymous said...

Have an English degree in English and used to teach English as a foreign language overseas and I've never heard of sentence mapping. Looks like fun, though.

The Missional Position said...

I went although the way through school in the 80's and into College by the 92. Grad school by 96. I never once was taught to diagram a sentence until grad school learning Greek. Is that a sad commentary on public education?

If it was not for Greek I would not have figured out this simple English sentence diagram.

Just discovered this blog and it is my instant favorite. Genius you are, JHagy.

HeoCwaeth said...

Genius card, agreed. But for those bagging on education or, to be precise, American public education for not providing children with adequate opportunities to diagram sentences I say simply this, "Dude, no."

What American education absolutely does not need any more of is rote learning.

inky squid said...

As a geologist, I interpreted this very differently to everyone else. The symbol on the right side of the diagram looks like a fault symbol, so I read the whole thing as "You are at fault".

 
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